fear of a Black President
Politics

Will We Ever Have Another Black President?

Well, we really have not had a black president as of yet – with both parents of African ancestry, we do have a president who is half black if you want to be really picky. But our president truly is African American. The answer to your question though, is most certainly!

Personally, I prefer the term “American African” and not the other way around.

 

To me that name best describes American people of African descent – Aren’t we ALL Americans with ancestors from other places? Literally, this is the melting pot nation. Even the ancestors of Native Americans migrated here from Beringia, present day Alaska, after coming from areas near Lake Baikal in Siberia.

Americans with ancestors from Africa – comprise approximately 13.2% of the US citizens. If Presidents were picked randomly as if by lottery (which of course is not the case), then over time, many presidents should be American African. The President of The United StatesTwo caveats – this percentage number changes over time, and remember that a person has to be over 35 to be eligible to run for President – so not everyone in that 13.2% is old enough to run. That however is true for the demographic of the rest of the population as well, so I do presume that the relative percentage of those adults 35 and over remains close.

This would mean that statistically, (randomly selected), 13.2% of future presidents might be American African.

Since we have elections only every four years, you can see that even if we had single term presidents, 100 new presidents, each of them occupying the White House for only one term – 4 years each would cover 400 years of administrations. 13 presidents spread over 400 years (or longer) does not seem too exciting for those looking to see our next American African president, but that works out to about one elected every 30 years. If we have all two term presidents, the theoretical number of black presidents elected would be one every 60 years. Keep in mind; statistics are just numbers which change as demographics change. I suspect it will likely be a lot sooner than this might seem to suggest.

We are experiencing the election process currently, so unless you are a new voter, I feel sure you know what I am about to say. Running for president is about selling yourself to the voters. It’s about all aspects of that person and how they are perceived. Each has their own qualifications, charisma, and presence, or lack of it.

In our current environment, my bet is that the next time we elect a Black president; she/he will be a moderate or perhaps a conservative. She or he has a much better chance of winning as a moderate. The majority of American voters group in the middle. They tend to be moderate.

Conservatives want to support a Black candidate even though they were not happy with the experience with President Obama. If the next black nominee is somewhat conservative, there will likely be cross-over votes from moderate voters that would give such a candidate a fair chance of winning.

 

fear of a Black President

Liberal voters I know, especially from Hollywood, have told me personally that they could never support a conservative candidate, no matter how excellent they thought they were. What a closed-minded approach, but that is politics.

I suggest you pick a candidate you support and volunteer your time to support them.  If you can afford to give a donation, we all know how politicians love donations! Speak your mind, make your presence known, and recruit others to your views.  Additionally, don’t give up even if you or your candidate doesn’t win. Do it again and again and make it happen.

What are your thoughts? Do you believe we will ever elect another Black president?

Originally posted 2015-08-13 15:26:48. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

2 thoughts on “Will We Ever Have Another Black President?

  1. I think we will. However, one of the statistics is wrong. If every president had 2 terms, then the theoretical number of black presidents elected would not be one every 60 years. It would still be one every 30 years, it is just that each one would be elected twice.

    Proving I am smarter than Albert.

    Also, I disagree with the statement that “Conservatives want to support a Black candidate even though they were not happy with the experience with President Obama”. Real conservatives want to support a candidate that they think best represents their ideas, regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, etc. If that candidate is Black, great! If it is a woman, great! If it is a Black woman, well, I will defer to your judgement on that!!

    1. Dear Reader,
      Thank you for your reply about the article, “Will We Every Have another Black President?”
      You replied: “I think we will. However one of the statistics is wrong. If every president had two terms, then the theoretical number of black presidents elected would not be one every 60 years. It would be one every 30 years. It is just that each one would be elected twice. Proving that I am Smarter Than Albert”
      I believe you misunderstand the calculation.

      We can only have 12 two – term presidents in a century, 12 x 8 is 96 years (plus one president with a 4 year term) If statistically 13% of presidents are black, then 13% of 12 men will be black. That will be 1.5 men.

      If you re-read the article you will see that I said 100 new presidents. That means 100 new presidents. Statistically 13% will be black presidents. 13% of 100 is 13. 13 presidents out of 100 presidents scattered over time, with each serving one term, occupies a full 400 years, or if serving two terms each it occupies 800 years, or if half one term and the other half two terms that occupies 600 years. In reality the 13% is nonsense – it is only a variable statistic. It is just as plausible that we could have several black presidents all in a row. But statistically the numbers are right.

      If what you said was correct, and black presidents did occupy the white house for 8 years (two terms) out of every thirty, then the black population would need to represent 8/30ths of the general population, or 26.6%. But blacks are about 13% of the population, and therefore statistically should only occupy the White House 13% of the time if elected equally with the general population.

      In conclusion, I stand by my previous statement that “If we have all two term presidents, the theoretical number of black presidents elected will be one every 60 years (about). I would certainly be pleased if it happened again in my life time. I think it is good for the country to have different leaders have the chance to lead.
      You also said:
      “I disagree with the statement that ‘conservatives want to support a black candidate even though they were not happy with the experience with Obama.’ Real conservatives want to support a candidate that they think best represents their ideas, regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, etc. If that candidate is black great! If it is a woman great! If it is a black woman, well, I defer to your judgement on that!”

      Let me caution you that when you write you should be aware that it is considered a philosophical blunder to try to justify your opinion by use of the term “REAL”, as in real men do this, or a real Democrat would do that. The implication is that if someone does something different and does not fit with what you want you simply conclude, “Oh, well, I’m still right because he’s not a real man or… whatever.” That makes your argument specious and subjective not objective. Further, I don’t agree fully with your conjecture. Conservatives like other groups tend to occupy a wide swath. Many are conservative fiscally, but liberals socially. Some are very near the middle and only slightly conservative. Some are far right and very opinionated. You are familiar with the conservatives that create the best headlines. You have likely never heard of the ones that do not.

      I think you are right that most everyone likes someone who believes about issues as they do, but our reality is that few politicians think exactly as we do. More often it seems that one may support one idea we like, but many we don’t and a different politician might support some other idea we like.
      Personally I believe our greatest voters are the ones who put aside selfish whims and desires that benefit themselves and instead vote for the candidate that they believe will likely do the greatest good for all – the very best job running our city, state or country. I don’t believe gender, race, orientation or religion are a factor.

      Just remember: Heroes don’t put themselves first they take personal risk for the benefit of others.

      Smarter Than Albert

Leave a Reply